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Increasing the accuracy of microseismic monitoring using surface patch arrays and a novel processing approachGreen Open Access

Authors: P.-F. Roux, J. Kostadinovic, T. Bardainne, E. Rebel, M. Chmiel, M. Van Parys, R. Macault and L. Pignot
Journal name: First Break
Issue: Vol 32, No 7, July 2014 pp. 95 - 101
DOI: EAGE-EXPORT-FAKE-DOI
Special topic: Passive Seismic
Language: English
Info: Article, PDF ( 1.47Mb )

Summary:
P.-F. Roux, J. Kostadinovic, T. Bardainne, E. Rebel, M. Chmiel, M. Van Parys, R. Macault and L. Pignot present an acquisition and processing technique to further decrease the noise recorded at the surface of the Earth when monitoring hydraulic stimulation. It is well known that fluid injection into reservoirs, be it in the context of enhanced geothermal systems or for the stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, generates so-called ‘induced’ seismic activity (Evans, 1966). Early on, the link between the stimulation and this activity has been established, and it has become increasingly obvious that measuring the microseismicity generated by the injection would provide a wealth of information on the mechanical processes at work during the stimulation. Historically, downhole geophone tools have been used to monitor microseismic activity during stimulation programmes. Such tools usually offer a very high sensitivity to the microseismic sources, provided that the observation well is close enough to the treated well (Rutledge and Phillips, 2003). However, this becomes limited when more information on the source mechanism (usually termed focal mechanism and represented by the infamous moment tensor) is required. This is because of the three-dimensional nature of the focal mechanism, which means it cannot be retrieved properly using a single observation point. In addition, a poorly situated observation well may indeed lead to a reduced detection capability.

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