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Application of amplitude spectrum and genetic inversion to determine shaly facies distribution: a case study: Murzuq Basin, LibyaNormal access

Authors: Y. Abushalah and L. Serpa
Journal name: Geophysical Prospecting
Issue: Vol 66, No 6, July 2018 pp. 1144 - 1158
DOI: doi: 10.1111/1365-2478.12627
Organisations: Wiley
Language: English
Info: Article, PDF ( 28.59Mb )

Summary:
Late Ordovician glacial deposits of the Mamuniyat Formation are the main oil reservoir in the Murzuq Basin in Libya. Autopicking the strong reflection at the base of the Silurian shales can be used to map the top of the Mamuniyat reservoir in the area where it is in direct contact with the Silurian shales. However, in areas where the Bir Tlacsin Formation, a mud-prone unit, is between the Silurian shales and the Mamuniyat reservoir, the top of the Mamuniyat is difficult to pick because the units juxtaposed across the boundary are too similar to produce a strong reflection. Defining the Bir Tlacsin facies is important because it impacts hydrocarbon accumulation and migration. To predict the distribution of the shaly facies of Bir Tlacsin and enhance mapping of the top Mamuniyat reservoir, we utilized a continuous wavelet transform to identify the distinctive thickness of the Hot Shale and Bir Tlacsin units. We also used genetic inversion to distinguish the bulk density of the Bir Tlacsin facies. A 64 Hz frequency gave good time resolution to the amplitude spectrum and was used to predict the facies distribution of the Bir Tlacsin. In contrast, the 24 Hz frequency showed good frequency resolution of the amplitude spectrum and was used to estimate the temporal thickness of the non-reservoir unit of Bir Tlacsin and Hot Shale. That estimate was then used to modify the autopick horizon for the base of the Silurian reflector to approximate the top of the Mamuniyat reservoir. Because of the large density contrast between the shaly facies of the Bir Tlacsin and the underlying and overlying units, inverted density also provides a way to predict the distribution of the Bir Tlacsin through estimated temporal thickness and to enhance mapping of the top Mamuniyat reservoir through mapping the base of the inverted density of the Bir Tlacsin. A comparison between mapping of the top reservoir using spectral decomposition and inverted density with respect to autopick shows that both methods improved the top of the Mamuniyat reservoir mapping. Prediction of the presence of Bir Tlacsin and improved accuracy of the top of the Mamuniyat reservoir mapping reduce the risk of drilling the shaly facies of Bir Tlacsin and provide a better estimate of the reservoir reserve.

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